Plant-Animal Interactions

plant-animal interactions

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262005

Date range: 

2005-01-01 to 2014-12-31

Original investigator: 

Brandon Bestelmeyer

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data download: 

Description: 

Data file (CSV) for the Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Plant Above Ground Net Primary Productivity by Site

Data file (CSV) for the Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Plant Above Ground Net Primary Productivity by Site

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262001

Date range: 

2008-04-21 to 2014-10-30

Original investigator: 

Brandon Bestelmeyer

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of plant measurements used to calculate the annual aboveground net 
   primary production (ANPP) across 3 habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  
   The habitats are grassland, mesquite shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The 
   plant forms are winter annual forb, annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, 

   Dataset consists of plant measurements used to calculate the annual aboveground net 
   primary production (ANPP) across 3 habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  
   The habitats are grassland, mesquite shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The 
   plant forms are winter annual forb, annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, 
   annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data download: 

Description: 

Data file (CSV) for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Quadrat Plant Measurement Data

Data file (CSV) for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Quadrat Plant Measurement Data

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

461

Data set ID: 

210461001

Date range: 

1996-02-27 to 2009-10-27

Original investigator: 

Kris Havstad

Abstract: 

The goal of this sampling effort is to describe the vegetation response to treatments.  Data were collected following the line-point intercept method (Herrick et al.

2009).  Although the original LPI data set was in multivariate form with separate columns for canopy layers and soil surface, this data set has been transposed into vertical form, implementing a “layer” variable, so that all species and soil surface codes appear in one column.  Within each exclosure, 4837 points were sampled with the following exceptions:

year

exclosure

total_points_sampled

1996

5

4825

1996

7

4836

1996

9

4836

1996

10

4836

1997

1

4830

1997

2

4830

1997

3

4830

1997

4

4830

1997

5

4830

1997

6

4830

1997

7

4830

1997

8

4830

1997

9

4830

1997

10

4830

1997

11

4830

1997

12

4830

1997

13

4830

1997

14

4830

1997

15

4830

1997

16

4830

1997

17

4830

1997

18

4830

2002

12

4835

 

Data download: 

Description: 

Project: 

Study Number: 461

Project ID: 

210461000

Original Investigator: 

Kris Havstad

Abstract: 

The objective of this project is to determine the effect of multiple stressors (grazing and shrub removal) on the decline and recovery of perennial grasses in a black grama-mesquite savanna on sand

y soils. The initial savanna state represents an intermediate and possibly stable state between black grama grassland and mesquite shrubland. The experimental manipulations removed about 60% of aboveground herbaceous biomass over 24-36 hour periods in each of four years (from summer 1996-winter 2000). One grazing treatment applied grazing in winter and the other in summer. Including controls (ungrazed and shrubs left intact), this results in 6 treatment combinations. Treatments were applied in a randomized complete block design within 3 replicate blocks resulting in 18 experimental units.  Experimental units were 0.5 ha (70 x 70 m) areas that have remained ungrazed by livestock after manipulations were completed in 2000.

Funding Source: 

USDA

Research Area: 

Data Category: 

Project: 

Study Number: 412

Project ID: 

210412000

Abstract: 

Stocking rates for cattle, horses, and sheep are provided for the Jornada Experimental Range beginning in 1916.

Goats were few and are included as part of the sheep category and not differentiated.

Funding Source: 

N/A

Research Area: 

Data Category: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

412

Data set ID: 

210412001

Date range: 

1916-01-01 to 2001-12-31

Original investigator: 

Kris Havstad

Abstract: 

Stocking rates for cattle, horses, and sheep are provided for the Jornada Experimental Range beginning in 1916. Goats were few and are included as part of the sheep category and not differentiated.

Stocking rates for cattle, horses, and sheep are provided for the Jornada Experimental Range beginning in 1916. Goats were few and are included as part of the sheep category and not differentiated.

Description: 

Data file information for the following Jornada data set: Jornada Experimental Range stocking rates for cattle, horses, and sheep beginning 1916

Project: 

Study Number: 392

Project ID: 

210392000

Original Investigator: 

Ken A Valentine

Abstract: 

Three exclosure sites each with sixteen 21.3 x 21.3 m plots were established in 1938/39 to evaluate the effects of lagomorph exclusion and shrub removal in a creosotebush dominated community.

The study sites, developed by Ken Valentine, were placed on the Jornada Experimental Range at the following locations: 1) outside the southeast corner of the Gravelly Ridges Artificial Revegetation Enclosure, 2) about one half mile southwest of Parker Tank, and 3) inside the Moisture Conservation Plots Enclosure about .15 mile east of the Dona Ana Revegetation Enclosure. Major dominant shrubs (creosotebush, mesquite, and tarbush) were individually severed at ground level and removed by hand in 1939, 1947, 1956, 1960, 1967, 1989, 1995, and 2001. Lagomorphs were excluded with poultry wire fencing in 1939 and integrity of fences is maintained. The objective of the original study was perennial grass responses to shrub removal, lagomorph exclusion, furrowing (shallow, hand raked furrows designed to trap surface water), and seeding (broadcast application of seeds of native perennials). Furrowing and seeding treatments were short lived and not repeated or maintained. All plots were sampled prior to initial treatment applications in 1938/39 and immediately following all subsequent shrub removal events. Each plot was divided into east and west halves and 14 randomly located 10.65 m line intercept transects were sampled for shrub canopy cover and perennial grass basal cover.

Funding Source: 

USDA

Research Area: 

Data Category: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262004

Date range: 

2005-01-01 to 2014-12-31

Original investigator: 

Brandon Bestelmeyer

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data download: 

Description: 

Data file (CSV) for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Plant Above Ground Net Primary Productivity by Plant Form

Data file (CSV) for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Study: Plant Above Ground Net Primary Productivity by Plant Form

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262010

Date range: 

2004-01-01 to 2014-12-31

Original investigator: 

Brandon Bestelmeyer

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation translate
   into pulses of plant above ground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the small mammal
   community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient across the landscape.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation translate
   into pulses of plant above ground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the small mammal
   community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient across the landscape.
   Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through the ecosystem in response to
   pulses of rain.

   HYPOTHESES:
   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.
   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along the
      shrub gradient.

   Variables measured:  Rodent abundance expressed as Minimum Number Known Alive (MNKA),
                        rodent biomas, rodent energy, and rodent species richness.

Data download: 

Description: 

CSV data file for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Rodent 1st Capture Metrics (abundance, biomass, energy, species richness)

CSV data file for Jornada dataset: Ecotone Rodent 1st Capture Metrics (abundance, biomass, energy, species richness)

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262008

Date range: 

2004-07-13 to 2014-10-24

Original investigator: 

Brandon Bestelmeyer

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation translate into
   pulses of plant above ground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the small mammal community
   responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient across the landscape.  Particularly

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation translate into
   pulses of plant above ground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the small mammal community
   responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient across the landscape.  Particularly
   we are interested in how the energy flows through the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain,
   how the small mammal community partition resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4
   (grasses) plants) and how the genetic structure of some species (i.e.:  Dipodomys spp.) is
   affected by their population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:
   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.
   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along the shrub
      gradient.
   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their availability (or
      NPP).
   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will be
      distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards higher values).
      After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater, dispersal prevalent, and
      the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within populations (i.e., Fst will
      approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Variables include rodent species, sex, reproductive status, weight, and maturity status were recorded.

Data download: 

Description: 

CSV data file for the Jornada dataset: Ecotone Rodent Trapping 1st Capture

CSV data file for the Jornada dataset: Ecotone Rodent Trapping 1st Capture

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