erosion

Dataset: 

Study number: 

36

Data set ID: 

210365001

Date range: 

1933-01-01 to 2011-12-31

Original investigator: 

Robert S Campbell

Abstract: 

In 1933 and 1935, two transects were established in the Natural Revegetation Exclosure and Pasture 8b, respectively, to measure long-term soil movement in areas undergoing mesquite invasion.

These two transects, established in a Prosopis-Bouteloua ecotone, were to: "measure any future changes in the extent or succession of three contiguous zones of vegetation, Bouteloua eriopoda, Gutierrezia, and Prosopis glandulosa dunes. Thus, future chartings of this transect should show whether, under the range management practiced, the succession is progressing toward the black grama climax or whether it is retrogressing toward mesquite sandhills." (E.L. Little, 1935, unpublished report) Soil movement at these transects was measured by the distance between the soil surface and a notch in 50 cm t-posts located every 15.2 m (50 ft). The 1731-m Natural Revegetation Exclosure tranect runs north-south through the center of the exclosure and extends 61 m (200ft) beyond the boundary fence on either end. It is located in primarily deep, loamy sand soils. The 457-m Pasture 8b transect is oriented WSW-ENE, and is located in shallower soils. These transects were measured in 1950 (8b only), 1955 (8b only), every five years from 1980-2000, and most recently in 2011. Most steel posts were remeasured at these intervals, but some were lost due to excavation or burial. These were for the most part replaced, with a new baseline notch height initiated on the posts. Data fields correspond to each year of collection, as well as measures of soil deposition or deflation during the intervals. Spatial data include post locations and identifiers.

Description: 

Data file information for the following Jornada data set: Soil movement across black grama-mesquite ecotones beginning in 1933

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

121

Data set ID: 

210121007

Date range: 

1996-06-01 to 1999-10-11

Original investigator: 

Laura Huenneke

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

[John Anderson added the following from info provided by Justin Van Zee and edited by Michelle Buonopane.] Overview: In semiarid ecosystems the diversity of plant functional types ( grasses, shrubs, succulents, and so on) and of species may interact with the severe stresses imposed by the desert environment to influence ecosystem processes.

Erosion and transport of surface sediment by wind and water is one process that may be affected by the physical structure of the plant community. The Jornada plant diversity experiment, in which the diversity and structure of the plant community have been manipulated in large (25 m x 25 m) plots, offers the opportunity to examine the relative importance of vegetation characteristics and landscape position in determining rates of sediment movement within the plots. Soil erosion is also an important indicator of relative disturbance effects of the treatment manipulations. Each of the 48 plots of the plant diversity experiment contains 5 pans or trays on the downslope side; these accumulate sediments and plant litter that are moving within the plots (carried by wind or by water). Data have been collected on the amount of sediment accumulated in the pans during rainy and during dry seasons, with material sorted and weighed as fine (< 2 mm diameter) or coarse > 2 mm) mineral sediment, plant litter, or rabbit/jackrabbit pellets. Previous statistical analyses found that the mass of material collected per plot is explained only poorly by the treatment (plant community manipulation) of the plot and by block (a rough indication of location on the slope). Objectives: We will test the relative significance of the following variables in explaining plot-level accumulations of sediment and litter: treatment, block, position on slope (the row, from 1 (top of slope) to 10 (bottom), in which the plot is located), the treatment of the plot immediately upslope from the plot, and indices of plant cover and volume (total and by functional group) from the plot-level sampling of vegetation (using fall 1997 data). In addition, we will test the significance of the following variables in explaining the accumulation of sediment and litter in individual pans within a plot: all variables listed above for the plot, plus indices of the vegetative cover and volume located immediately upslope of the pan (weighted for distance from the pan itself).

Data download: 

Description: 

Data file information for the following Jornada data set: Soil erosion pan

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

121

Data set ID: 

210121002

Date range: 

1998-06-29 to 1998-07-31

Original investigator: 

Laura Huenneke

Data contact: 

Abstract: 

Overview: In semiarid ecosystems the diversity of plant functional types ( grasses, shrubs, succulents, and so on) and of species may interact with the severe stresses imposed by the desert environment to influence ecosystem processes. Erosion and transport of surface sediment by wind and water is one process that may be affected by the physical structure of the plant community.

The Jornada plant diversity experiment, in which the diversity and structure of the plant community have been manipulated in large (25 m x 25 m) plots, offers the opportunity to examine the relative importance of vegetation characteristics and landscape position in determining rates of sediment movement within the plots. Each of the 48 plots of the plant diversity experiment contains 5 pans or trays on the downslope side; these accumulate sediments and plant litter that are moving within the plots (carried by wind or by water). Data have been collected on the amount of sediment accumulated in the pans during rainy and during dry seasons, with material sorted and weighed as fine (< 2 mm diameter) or coarse > 2 mm) mineral sediment, plant litter, or rabbit/jackrabbit pellets. Previous statistical analyses found that the mass of material collected per plot is explained only poorly by the treatment (plant community manipulation) of the plot and by block (a rough indication of location on the slope). Objectives: We will test the relative significance of the following variables in explaining plot-level accumulations of sediment and litter: treatment, block, position on slope (the row, from 1 (top of slope) to 10 (bottom), in which the plot is located), the treatment of the plot immediately upslope from the plot, and indices of plant cover and volume (total and by functional group) from the plot-level sampling of vegetation (using fall 1997 data). In addition, we will test the significance of the following variables in explaining the accumulation of sediment and litter in individual pans within a plot: all variables listed above for the plot, plus indices of the vegetative cover and volume located immediately upslope of the pan (weighted for distance from the pan itself). Response variables: Vegetative cover measurements are made immediately upslope of erosion pans to estimate plant cover and volume. This is done at two scales. The three large quadrats (2 m x 2 m) are used to look at all large plants (height > 25 cm) rooted within them. The six small plots (50 cm x 50 cm) are used to look at all small plants (greater or equal to 3 cm maximum diameter, but less than or equal to 10 cm) rooted within them. Maximum diameter, maximum perpendicular diameter, and height are measured to the nearest centimeter.

Data download: 

Description: 

Data file information for the following Jornada data set: Erosion zone vegetation

LTER Core Area(s): 

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