decomposition

Dataset: 

Study number: 

387

Data set ID: 

210387003

Abstract: 

*We designed a study to examine the long-term spatial and temporal patterns of mass loss, changes in nitrogen content and chemical composition during decomposition of roots in a desert watershed. Because nitrogen availability has been hypothesized to affect decomposition rates of buried litter in deserts, we studied decomposition of roots along a transect on a desert watershed that had been fertilized with ammonium nitrate and compared these results with the decomposition of roots along a transect that had not been fertilized.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_387_transect_root_decomposition_weight

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

387

Data set ID: 

210387001

Abstract: 

*We designed a study to examine the long-term spatial and temporal patterns of mass loss, changes in nitrogen content and chemical composition during decomposition of roots in a desert watershed. Because nitrogen availability has been hypothesized to affect decomposition rates of buried litter in deserts, we studied decomposition of roots along a transect on a desert watershed that had been fertilized with ammonium nitrate and compared these results with the decomposition of roots along a transect that had not been fertilized.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_387_transect_root_decomposition_chemistry

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

372

Data set ID: 

210372001

Abstract: 

*Changes in microarthropod assemblages were monitored in six types of decomposing surface leaf-litter confined in mesh bags and set across a Chihuahuan Desert watershed for 17 months. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) microarthropod density and diversity are higher in soils with maximum surface litter accumulation, and 2) temporal patterns of density and diversity are more dependent on seasonal factors and physical disturbances than on the decompositional stage of the litter.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_372_transect_leaf_litter_microarthropod

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

385

Data set ID: 

210385006

Abstract: 

An ion exchange resin bag technique (Binkley 1984, Lajtha 1988) was used to determine N availability in the rhizosphere of fluffgrass. Ion exchange resin bags were used to determine NH4. Twenty 6 x 6 m plots were established with a 3 m buffer between plots. Five plots were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (1) chlordane amendment 100ml AI (active ingredients) per 10,000 ml) to exclude microarthropods, (2) sprinkler irrigation (6 mm per week), (3) sprinkler irrigation (6 mm/week) plus chlordate amendment (as above), (4) control (no treatment). Two CA-bags were placed in the rhizosphere of a fluffgrass in each plot. Bags were left in the field 3 months, collected, brought to the lab and analyzed for NO3.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_385_fluff_grass_cation_exchange_resin_nh4

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

385

Data set ID: 

210385005

Abstract: 

An ion exchange resin bag technique (Binkley 1984, Lajtha 1988) was used to determine N availability in the rhizosphere of fluffgrass. Ion exchange resin bags were used to determine NO3. Twenty 6 x 6 m plots were established with a 3 m buffer between plots. Five plots were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (1) chlordane amendment 100ml AI (active ingredients) per 10,000 ml) to exclude microarthropods, (2) sprinkler irrigation (6 mm per week), (3) sprinkler irrigation (6 mm/week) plus chlordate amendment (as above), (4) control (no treatment). 8 AN-bags were placed in the rhizosphere of a fluffgrass in each plot. Bags were left in the field 3 months, collected, brought to the lab and analyzed for NO3.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_385_fluff_grass_anion_exchange_resin_no3

LTER Core Area(s): 

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