Plant

Plant dataset or project

Dataset: 

Data set ID: 

210120001

Abstract: 

This ongoing data set contains percent canopy cover estimates of perennial plant species from transects that cross a grazed/ungrazed boundary fenceline of a single exclosure on the New Mexico State University Chihuahuan Desert Rangeland Research Center in Dona Ana County, New Mexico, USA. In the spring of 1982, as part of the establishment of the Jornada Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico, a 135 ha portion of a 1500 ha, internally drained, watershed was exclosed from grazing by domestic livestock. Prior to exclosure the watershed, as well as the rest of the Jornada basin, had been moderately to heavily grazed for the past 100 years. Concurrent with grazing, the vegetation had undergone a dramatic change from desert grassland, with an almost continuous cover of C4 perennial grasses, to isolated patches of the original grassland in a mosaic with desert shrub dominated plant communities (Buffington and Herbel, 1965). The exclosure lies along a northeast facing piedmont slope at the base of a steep isolated mountain peak, and covers a variety of component landforms from the foot of the mountain to the basin floor. This provided the opportunity to investigate the response of vegetation with respect to landscape characteristics as well as release from grazing. This summary data set consists of percent canopy cover of all perennial plant species from the plant line intercept measurements on either side of the LTER-I exclosure East and West boundary fence. Sampling occurs approximately every five years; it was last conducted in November 2015 and will take place again in 2020.  

Boxplots at canopy cover by form: https://jornada.nmsu.edu/sites/jornada.nmsu.edu/files/files/data/Canopy_cover_boxplots_1.jpg

Location on EDI: https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/metadataviewer?packageid=knb-lter-jrn.210120001

Data sources: 

Study120_CanopyCover

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

328

Data set ID: 

210328001

Abstract: 

This ongoing dataset contains annual aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) data from a study at the Jornada Experimental Range (JER) in southern New Mexico. The study was designed to assess the effect of interannual variability in precipitation on average aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands. The study began in 2009, has five precipitation treatments (see Methods) and contains 50 plots (10 per treatment). This data package contains 6-year (2009 to 2014) means of ANPP per plot. Annual and more recent data are available and will be released pending an upcoming publication.

Figure of 6-year ANPP by plant functional group: https://jornada.nmsu.edu/sites/jornada.nmsu.edu/files/files/data/ANPP_figure.jpg

Location of dataset on EDI: https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/metadataviewer?packageid=knb-lter-jrn.210328001.1

Data sources: 

ANPP_6yr_means_precip_variability

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262005

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_262005_ecotone_npp_by_site

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262001

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of plant measurements used to calculate the annual aboveground net 
   primary production (ANPP) across 3 habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  
   The habitats are grassland, mesquite shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The 
   plant forms are winter annual forb, annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, 
   annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_262001_ecotone_quad_plant_measurement

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

308

Data set ID: 

210308005

Abstract: 

    Repeat digital groundbased photos are taken once to twice a year to document plant litter and
    soil deposition or removal by wind and water transport on ten microplots located on each of the
    8 plots at each of the Aeolian, Dona Ana, and Gravelly Ridges sites. Five photos are taken of
    each microplot: One overhead (from directly over the microplot) and 4 lateral views at ground
    level of the microplot from each cardinal direction.

   Digital filenames are fully descriptive of the site, plot, microplot, photo view, and date taken.
   Photo filename structure:
      Example: A1-1E_20101109_IMG_1006368.jpg
               12-34_55556677_88888888888.jpg
         Where 1 = site: A=Aeolian: D=Dona Ana; G=Gravelly Ridges
               2 = plot (1-8)
               3 = microplot (1-10)
               4= photo view (O=overview; E=looking east; N=looking north; S=looking south; W=looking west
               5-6-7 = year month day of photo
               8 = original image number assigned by camera

Data sources: 

photos_Jornada_308005_conmod_pilot

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

461

Data set ID: 

210461001

Abstract: 

The goal of this sampling effort is to describe the vegetation response to treatments.  Data were collected following the line-point intercept method (Herrick et al. 2009).  Although the original LPI data set was in multivariate form with separate columns for canopy layers and soil surface, this data set has been transposed into vertical form, implementing a “layer” variable, so that all species and soil surface codes appear in one column.  Within each exclosure, 4837 points were sampled with the following exceptions:

year

exclosure

total_points_sampled

1996

5

4825

1996

7

4836

1996

9

4836

1996

10

4836

1997

1

4830

1997

2

4830

1997

3

4830

1997

4

4830

1997

5

4830

1997

6

4830

1997

7

4830

1997

8

4830

1997

9

4830

1997

10

4830

1997

11

4830

1997

12

4830

1997

13

4830

1997

14

4830

1997

15

4830

1997

16

4830

1997

17

4830

1997

18

4830

2002

12

4835

 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_461001_stressor_ii_plant_line

LTER Core Area(s): 

Project: 

Study Number: 461

Project ID: 

210461000

Original Investigator: 

Kris Havstad

Funding Source: 

USDA

Research Area: 

Data Category: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

308

Data set ID: 

210308002

Abstract: 

    Line-Point Intercept data are collected annually for this project beginning in 2008. No data were
    collected in 2011. There are 4 pairs of plots consisting of control and treatment. Each plot is
    8x8 meters with an 8x8 meter buffer plot above and below it. Treatment plots have connectivity modules
    (conmods) installed to decrease gap size between perennials.  Buffer plots do not have conmods.
    Four 24-meter transects run through the plot and 2 buffer plots. These transects are spaced
    0.8, 2.8, 4.3, and 7.2 meters across the plots (denoted as 1, 3, 5, and 7 meters in the database),
    paralleling the long axis of the combined buffer plots and central plot.
         Aeolian site:         Control plots 2,4,5,8  Treatment plots 1,3,6,7
         Dona Ana site:        Control plots 2,4,5,7  Treatment plots 1,3,6,8
         Gravelly Ridges site: Control plots 1,3,5,7  Treatment plots 2,4,6,8
 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_308001_conmod_pilot_plant_line

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

308

Data set ID: 

210308001

Abstract: 

Canopy Gap and Basal Gap Intercept data are collected annually for this project beginning in 2008. No data were collected in 2011. There are 4 pairs of plots consisting of control and treatment. Each plot is 8x8 meters with an 8x8 meter buffer plot above and below it. Treatment plots have connectivity modules (conmods) installed to decrease gap size between perennials. Buffer plots do not have conmods. Four 24-meter transects run through the plot and 2 buffer plots. These transects are spaced 0.8, 2.8, 4.3, and 7.2 meters across the plots (denoted as 1, 3, 5, and 7 meters in the database), paralleling the long axis of the combined buffer plots and central plot.
Aeolian site:                Control plots 2,4,5,8  Treatment plots 1,3,6,7
Dona Ana site:            Control plots 2,4,5,7  Treatment plots 1,3,6,8
Gravelly Ridges site:  Control plots 1,3,5,7  Treatment plots 2,4,6,8

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_308001_conmod_pilot_gap

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Project: 

Study Number: 308

Project ID: 

210308000

Original Investigator: 

Debra Peters

Funding Source: 

NSF

Research Area: 

Data Category: 

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