Primary Production

LTER Core Area: Primary Production

Dataset: 

Study number: 

328

Data set ID: 

210328001

Abstract: 

This ongoing dataset contains annual aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) data from a study at the Jornada Experimental Range (JER) in southern New Mexico. The study was designed to assess the effect of interannual variability in precipitation on average aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands. The study began in 2009, has five precipitation treatments (see Methods) and contains 50 plots (10 per treatment). This data package contains 6-year (2009 to 2014) means of ANPP per plot. Annual and more recent data are available and will be released pending an upcoming publication.

Figure of 6-year ANPP by plant functional group: https://jornada.nmsu.edu/sites/jornada.nmsu.edu/files/files/data/ANPP_figure.jpg

Location of dataset on EDI: https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/metadataviewer?packageid=knb-lter-jrn.210328001.1

Data sources: 

ANPP_6yr_means_precip_variability

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262005

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of the annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) across 3
   habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  The habitats are grassland, mesquite
   shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The plant forms are winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and
   sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_262005_ecotone_npp_by_site

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

262

Data set ID: 

210262001

Abstract: 

   Dataset consists of plant measurements used to calculate the annual aboveground net 
   primary production (ANPP) across 3 habitats grouped by plant form and total ANPP.  
   The habitats are grassland, mesquite shrubland, and the ecotone between the 2. The 
   plant forms are winter annual forb, annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, 
   annual grass, perennial grass, shrub, and sub-shrub.

   OBJECTIVE:  The purpose of the study is to investigate how pulses of precipitation
   translate into pulses of plant aboveground net primary productivity (NPP) and how the
   small mammal community responds to such changes also in relation to shrub gradient
   across the landscape.  Particularly we are interested in how the energy flows through
   the ecosystem in response to pulses of rain, how the small mammal community partition
   resources (in terms of C3 (forbs and shrubs) and C4 (grasses) plants) and how the
   genetic structure of some species (e.g., Dipodomys spp.) is affected by their
   population dynamics.

   HYPOTHESES:

   1) Small mammal abundance should respond positively to precipitation and NPP.

   2) On a temporal scale, the small mammal energy use should show parallel fluxes along
   the shrub gradient.

   3) The small mammal community should consume C3 and C4 plants according to their
   availability (or NPP).

   4) At low population density, dispersal should be limited and the genetic variance will
   be distributed among populations rather than within (i.e., Fst will trend towards
   higher values).  After pulses of rain and NPP, population densities will be greater,
   dispersal prevalent, and the genetic variance of populations will be distributed within
   populations (i.e., Fst will approach zero) as dispersal homogenizes populations.

   Total aboveground annual net primary productivty is calculated for winter annual forb,
   annual forb, bi-annual forb, perennial forb, annual grass, perennial grass, shrub,
   sub-shrub, and the total of these.
 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_262001_ecotone_quad_plant_measurement

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

461

Data set ID: 

210461001

Abstract: 

The goal of this sampling effort is to describe the vegetation response to treatments.  Data were collected following the line-point intercept method (Herrick et al. 2009).  Although the original LPI data set was in multivariate form with separate columns for canopy layers and soil surface, this data set has been transposed into vertical form, implementing a “layer” variable, so that all species and soil surface codes appear in one column.  Within each exclosure, 4837 points were sampled with the following exceptions:

year

exclosure

total_points_sampled

1996

5

4825

1996

7

4836

1996

9

4836

1996

10

4836

1997

1

4830

1997

2

4830

1997

3

4830

1997

4

4830

1997

5

4830

1997

6

4830

1997

7

4830

1997

8

4830

1997

9

4830

1997

10

4830

1997

11

4830

1997

12

4830

1997

13

4830

1997

14

4830

1997

15

4830

1997

16

4830

1997

17

4830

1997

18

4830

2002

12

4835

 

Data sources: 

data_Jornada_461001_stressor_ii_plant_line

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

120

Data set ID: 

210120002

Abstract: 

BACKGROUND. In the spring of 1982, as part of the establishment of the Jornada Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico, a 135 ha portion of a 1500 ha, internally drained, watershed was exclosed from grazing by domestic livestock. Prior to exclosure the watershed, as well as the rest of the Jornada basin, had been moderately to heavily grazed for the past 100 years. Concurrent with grazing, the vegetation had undergone a dramatic change from desert grassland, with an almost continuous cover of C4 perennial grasses, to isolated patches of the original grassland in a mosaic with desert shrub dominated plant communities (Buffington and Herbel, 1965). The exclosure lies along a northeast facing piedmont slope at the base of a steep isolated mountain peak, and covers a variety of component landforms from the foot of the mountain to the basin floor. This provided the opportunity to investigate the response of vegetation with respect to landscape characteristics as well as release from grazing. This summary data set consists of percent cover of 9 species from the plant line intercept measurements on either side of the LTER-I exclosure East and West boundary fence. Data is sorted by station, species i.d., then line segment. Along the East Boundary fence, the east side is ungrazed (control) and the west side is grazed (treatment). Along the West Boundary fence, the east side is grazed and the west side is ungrazed. Each plant line transect is divided into 6 5-meter segments. All perennials were measured at about 5 year intervals as the length of intercept along a 30-meter line perpendicular to the fence. Summary data includes only four of the 6 5-meter intervals due to disturbance along fenceline. Data from the 5-meter segment on either side of the fence was not included in summarizing the data. Summary data includes only 9 of the perennial species.

Data sources: 

data_JRN_120002_fence_plant_line_intercept_percent_cover_1982_92

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

351

Data set ID: 

210351002

Abstract: 

The data set, along with other long-term data collected at multiple spatial scales, is being used to identify the landscape, climatic, and anthropogenic factors that influence grass abundance, growth, and persistence. Variable measured is plant density by species.

Data sources: 

JornadaStudy_351_permanent_chart_quadrat_perennial_forb_density_data

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

351

Data set ID: 

210351001

Abstract: 

The data set, along with other long-term data collected at multiple spatial scales, is being used to identify the landscape, climatic, and anthropogenic factors that influence grass abundance, growth, and persistence. Variables measured are basal area of grasses, canopy area of shrubs, and perimeters of both.

Data sources: 

JornadaStudy_351_permanent_chart_quadrat_perennial_forb_density_data

LTER Core Area(s): 

Keywords: 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

27

Data set ID: 

210278002

Abstract: 

A 2-year experiment with ambient, reduced, and enhanced precipitation as well as nitrogen additions was designed to compare the performance of the  encroaching C3 shrub (honey mesquite Prosopis glandulosa) to the dominant C4 grass (black grama Bouteloua eriopoda) in terms of photosynthetic rates and leaf water status. Precipitation manipulations dramatically enhanced natural variability and generated a range of rainfall scenarios that could have only been studied only after a multi-decade effort using natural conditions.We use vegetation cover as a proxy for plant biomass to avoid confounding spatial and temporal variability or confounding the impact of harvesting.  Individual cover of plant species was measured  using three parallel transects per plot. This study is complete.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_278_changes_in_npp_water_availability_plant_cover

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

40

Data set ID: 

210409002

Abstract: 

Increases in woody vegetation and declines in grasses in arid and semi-arid ecosystems have occurred globally since the 1800s, but the mechanisms driving this major land-cover change remain uncertain and controversial. Working in a shrub-encroached grassland in the northern Chihuahuan Desert where grasses and shrubs typically differ in leaf-level nitrogen allocation, photosynthetic pathway, and root distribution, we asked if differences in leaf level ecophysiology could help explain shrub proliferation. We predicted that the relative performance of grasses and shrubs would vary with soil moisture due to the different morphological and physiological characteristics of the two life-forms. In a 2-year experiment with ambient, reduced,and enhanced precipitation during the monsoon season, respectively, the encroaching C3 shrub (honey mesquite Prosopis glandulosa) consistently and substantially outperformed the historically dominant C4 grass (black grama Bouteloua eriopoda) in terms of photosynthetic rates while also maintaining a more favorable leaf water status. This data set includes leaf water potential for each leaf measured while data on photosynthetic rates can be found in package 210409001. This study is complete. Please refer to: Throop, H., Archer, S. R. , and L. G. Reichmann. 2011. Response of dominant grass and shrub species to water manipulation: an ecophysiological basis for shrub invasion in a Chihuahuan Desert Grassland. Oecologia 169: 373-383.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_409_precipitation_treatments_predawn_leaf_water_potential

LTER Core Area(s): 

Dataset: 

Study number: 

40

Data set ID: 

210409001

Abstract: 

 

Increases in woody vegetation and declines in grasses in arid and semi-arid ecosystems have occurred globally since the 1800s, but the mechanisms driving this major land-cover change remain uncertain and controversial. Working in a shrub-encroached grassland in the northern Chihuahuan Desert where grasses and shrubs typically differ in leaf-level nitrogen allocation, photosynthetic pathway, and root distribution, we asked if differences in leaf level ecophysiology could help explain shrub proliferation. We predicted that the relative performance of grasses and shrubs would vary with soil moisture due to the different morphological and physiological characteristics of the two life-forms. In a 2-year experiment with ambient, reduced,and enhanced precipitation during the monsoon season, respectively, the encroaching C3 shrub (honey mesquite Prosopis glandulosa) consistently and substantially outperformed the historically dominant C4 grass (black grama Bouteloua eriopoda) in terms of photosynthetic rates while also maintaining a more favorable leaf water status. This study is complete.

 

Please refer to:

Throop, H., Archer, S. R. , and L. G. Reichmann. 2011. Response of dominant grass and shrub species to water manipulation: an ecophysiological basis for shrub invasion in a Chihuahuan Desert Grassland. Oecologia 169: 373-383.

Data sources: 

data_JornadaStudy_409_precipitation_treatments_leaf_photosynthetic_rates

LTER Core Area(s): 

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