Response of True Prairie Vegetation on Major Flint Hills Range Sites to Grazing Treatment

TitleResponse of True Prairie Vegetation on Major Flint Hills Range Sites to Grazing Treatment
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1959
AuthorsHerbel CH, Anderson KL
JournalEcological Monographs
Volume29
Pagination171-186
Date Published1959
Keywordschanges in vegetation, excessive grazing, monograph, prairie vegetation
Abstract

Native prairie has been the home of grazing animals for untold centuries. Prairie plants are eminently adapted to grazing, and moderate grazing use is not detrimental to their development. Climax grassland when properly grazed retains essentially its natural composition. Yet, when livestock are placed on range too early in the season, when they are left there too long, or when too many animals are confined to an area, grazing becomes so excessive that normal plant cover cannot be maintained. Numerous changes in the vegetation then occur. The rate at which these changes take place depends on the degree of abuse. They sometimes take place so gradually that deterioration may not readily be recognized until the plant cover has been greatly modified, but when prairie is grazed intensively major changes may occur within a few years.

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Alternate JournalEcological Society of America